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than 10,000 kilometers capable of reaching the u.s. west coast. experts used data from previous launches to make their estimate. they say a missile launched in 2009 had a range of almost 7,000 kilometers. north korean officials tried again in april. the rocket exploded shortly after takeoff. seconds longer tn those used 18 inrevious attempts. the experts believe engineers may have succeeded in reducing the size of a nuclear warhead. south korean officials say workers have completed the assembly of the three-stage missile. they say once the crew injects the fuel, it will be ready to go. authorities in pyongyang say they've launch between the 10th and 22nd of this month. they say they're sending a satellite into orbit. but leaders of japan and other countries believe the north koreans are carrying out a test of a long-range ballistic missile. the senior u.s. diplomat on north korea has warned the leadership there. he said the u.s. will refer the matter to the u.n. security council if they go ahead with the launch. >> we will be prepared to work with our partners, including at the
and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines and hope that a man who has slaughtered nearly 40,000 men, women and children in syria will decide not to take the next step and use far more destructive weapons to kill significantly larger numbers of people, whether to take military action of some kind that could prevent a mass atrocity. if that is the choice we now face, it is a grave and sobering decision and would put the starkest expression on the failure of the administration's policy towards syria. savage and unfair fight, this raged now for nearly two years. the longer this conflict has gone, the worse it has gotten. all of those who argued for non intervention because of the things tha
support the inflammatory flames heard on the floor of the u.s. senate used to block a u.n. treaty. a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the world. hundreds of millions. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute. some had signaled support for the treaty and then indicated they'd vote for it only to vote against it. one of the measure's co-sponsored, jerry mirrand, actually voted against it. so the guy who co-sponsored it voted against it. we asked him to come on the program yesterday, today as well. he declined. a former senator got involved on this as
is ahead. let's keep the conversation going. find us on facebook and twitter. our handle is cnn bottom line. "cnn saturday morning" continues now with the top stories we're watching. >>> from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, this is "cnn saturday morning." some are calling it the next roe v. wade or brown v. board of education. the issue the u.s. supreme court agreed to take on that will make history. >> all of those who argued for nonintervention because of the things that might happen have now happened because we failed to intervene. >>> when is enough enough? that is the question many are asking about syria, as the death toll climbs and concerns mount over chemical weapons. now some lawmakers are saying it may be too late to stop mass destruction. >>> and a toddler taken from the only parents she ever knew because of a little known federal law. now they're fighting to get her back, and may be on their way to the supreme court. i'll talk with them live. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. it is 10:00 on the east coast, 7:00 on the west. thanks so much for starting your day with
rule by the leader democrats. its leaders promised a lot as people used to being in opposition often do. they said they would cut government spending. they said they would stop the construction of a multimillion-dollar dam, make expressways toll free. prime minister noda had to come out last month to apologize for all the broken promises. support for his party slumped under his watch. the dpj offered a confused response to the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear crisis. noda oversaw the restart of nuclear reactors, and he embraced unpopular causes such as the hike in the consumption tax. opposition leaders have criticized the dpj for putting the alliance with the u.s. in danger by flip-flopping on relocating american bases. you know, opposition parties will be making these same arguments to voters. >> so how do you rate the opposition's chances of winning? >> mm-hmm. recent polls suggest that main opposition leader democrats could regain power. you know, leader shinzo abe has already served as a prime minister in 2006 and '07. he says he would not yield in territorial fight with china and
dog is a bad driver. >> he used your car to mount a nissan sentra. the number one sign your dog is a bad driver, always taking eyes off road to lick himself. >> reporter: being trained to drive with treats is sure to have dogs heading for the closest drive-through. do you want to be the designated driver? who wants tonight designated driver tonight? >> definitely not napoleon. driving is his waterloo. jeanne moos, cnn. i said hit the brake, not eat the cake. new york. >> too funny. thanks for starting your morning with us. we've got much more ahead on "cnn saturday morning" which saturday right now. good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. victor blackwell is off today. it's 8:00 on the east coast, 5:00 out west. thanks for starting your day with us. we start with syria and a plan for dealing with the country's chemical weapons. president obama has threatened action if chemical weapons are used, and now we have learned that the pentagon is updating military options for the president. we'll have more on the president's red line and the military options in about ten minutes. >>> be
in northwest. healthpeak to the world organization piece a director for the eastern mediterranean joining us now on the telephone from cairo. the deaths of nine health workers in 24 hours in pakistan is surely an alarming six ways and. >> very tragic. this is really a sad day for global health, but said they also for the children in pakistan. we joined the government of pakistan in condemning the killings that have been taking place over the last three days. >> while you are condemning the killings taking place in pakistan, why weren't these volunteers putting their lives at risk and in fact, polio workers have been threatened in the past, why weren't they given adequate protection? >> the government of pakistan is organizing these campaigns with support of the world health organization, unicef, international partners. we do our very best to protect all polio workers in pakistan. but you know, this is a huge country and the government of pakistan is of course organizing these campaigns. >> but this is a campaign backed by the united nations and the world health organization. why isn't the wo
of the people but also of the french people. >> following that speech for us was our correspondent who explains now why president hollande avoided a more specific apology. >> it seems as though he is taking the route of truth than apologies or using the word sorry, because that would be very difficult for french people to swallow because after all suffering. these were people whose parents, grandparents, and great grandparents were born in algeria. president hollande would have alienated all those people and not done justice to their memories or their suffering if he came out with a one-sided apology. what he did do was in clear, unequivocal terms acknowledging the crimes of the past. >> it is about as gloomy as a prediction that could have been made about syria. >> we do not see any prospect of any end of violence or political dialogue to start. >> he also said he is worried about atrocities being committed by both sides then theya uninvestigation has found rebel fighters. the secretary expressed support. this video is said to show rebels detaining fighters in a refugee camp. these pictures ar
on the first part of that. >> democracy now! questions u.s. climate negotiator jonathan pershing about criticism of the failure to do more to cut emissions and save the planet from catastrophic climate change. we will speak with ronny jumeau and martin khor of the south centre in malaysia, and then anjali appadurai. >> you have been negotiating my whole life, you have failed to meet targets and a broken promises. >> a year after calling on world figures to do more to save the planet, the 22-year-old american college student was banned from the climate talks here in doha for the first week. she joins us today h. then we look at how the koch brothers are influencing climate policy.politic this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the death toll from a massive typhoon in the southern philippines has doubled to more than 270 people. typhoon bopha is the most southerly typhoon ever recorded in the western pacific and the strongest to hit the philippines this year. 80,000 people have been forced to flee their homes. we will have more from doha after
heroes sometimes ♪ >> reporter: kareen wynter, cnn, los angeles. >>> that's all for us tonight. "ac 360" starts now. >>> good evening. it's 10:00. we begin as we do every night, keeping them honest. our goal is just reporting. finding the truth, looking for facts. for two nights, we've been looking for any fact a single shred of evidence that might support the inflammatory flames heard on the floor of the u.s. senate used to block a u.n. treaty. a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the world. hundreds of millions. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute.
's cory booker tomorrow night. it should be fascinating. that's it for us tonight. "ac 360" starts now. not trying to take sides. our goal is real reporting, finding out the truth. all calls out hip pock see. this is a baffling case of flip-flopping. this is a story we reported last night and is stranger the more we look into it. it's a long story, but stay with us. on tuesday the senate rejected a u.n. treaty aimed at protecting the rights of disabled people around the world. 125 other countries ratified this, but in the full senate 38 republicans voted no leaving the treaty five votes short of ratification. what we learned today that's interesting is some of these same senators actually supported the treaty before they voted against it. some even pledged their support very publicly. senator roy blunt of missouri was a flip-flopper and kay bailey hutchinson of texas and senator jerry moran of kansas. we asked them all to come on the program and they declined. they're silent on this. senator moran was a co-sponsor of the measure to ratify the treaty. he even put a press release back in
that might support the inflammatory claims heard on the floor of the u.s. senate that were used to block a u.n. treaty, a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the entire world. now, the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities and it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. now, the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans or vets who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the treaty. 125 countries ratified the treaty but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republicans, senators, voted against it. their names right there on the right of the screen. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute, some senators had actually signaled support for the treaty, then indicated that they would vote for it only to vote against it. one of the actual measures co-sponsors of it, he actually voted against it. one of the co-sponsors. amazing. he voted against the bill he had co-sponsored. we asked him to c
" character. alec baldwin live tomorrow night. that's all for us tonight. "ac 360" starts now. >>> good evening. it's 10:00 on the east coast and we begin with brooking news on the looming fiscal cliff. and signs of a potential fall. for the past few nights we've been telling you about the frustrating lack of progress to avert a deal on automatic tax hikes and spending cuts that kick in less than four weeks from now. poll after poll shows the american people want compromise. but there weren't many signs that was going to happen, nothing was getting done. in a cnn/crc poll, 67% said washington officials would behave like spoiled children in the fiscal cliff discussions. only 28% said they would behave like responsible adults. tonight, signs that maybe some adult behavior might be prevail. and a compromise might be reached. joining me now, dana bash, jessica yellin, and david gergen. what's the latest? >> reporter: they are a long way from a deal. but late today speaker boehner and president obama did speak to one another on the phone. now, this is an important development because it's th
clinton was nominated for "50 shades of grey." >> thanks for starting your morning with us. we have much more ahead on "cnn saturday morning" which starts right now. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. victor blackwell is off. it is 7:00 on the east coast, thanks so much for starting your morning with cnn. it was supposed to be just for laughs. humor. the listeners with a lighthearted prank. two radio deejays called the hospital where the duchess of cambridge was getting treated and tricked a nurse to give details of her condition. two days later the nurse took her own life and now the deejays behind it are off the air. >> the house has mutually decided that this show will not return until further notice out of respect of what can only be described as a tragedy. >> cnn's matthew chance has more now on the story generating outrage around the world. >> you know what, they were the worst accents ever. >> it was meant as a light hearted aussie prank, even after their station issued an apologies the two deejays made light of it. >> we were sure at least 100 people before us would try
be disastrous for us to use the debt ceiling as a cudgel to try to win political points on capitol hill. so we're not going to do that because the justice department has formally unveiled its $1.5 billion settlement with the swiss banking giant ubs for the company's role in the manipulation of the london interbank offered rate, or libor, which provides the basis rates on trillions of dollars in transactions across the globe. on wednesday, the assistant attorney general said ubs had played a key part in the reckless attempt to manipulate rates for profit. >> the banks conduct was simply astonishing. hundreds of trillions of dollars, credit card debt, student loans, financial derivatives and other financial products worldwide, are tied to libor. which serves as the premier benchmark for short-term interest rates. in short, the global marketplace depends upon all of us relying on an accurate libor. yet ubs, like barclays before it, sought repeatedly to fix libor for its own ends. in this case, so ubs traders could maximize profit on their trading positions, and so the bank would not appear to be
now!" >> there is this long standing relationship, should give us pause about the people we support today because we don't know what sort of consequences we may be engineering tomorrow. >> we speak with matthieu aikins who is just returned from two months in pakistan, examining what led to the capture and killing of osama bin laden. his piece is called, "the doctor, the cia, and the blood of bin laden." that is the african national congress in south africa votes to support a boycott divestment and sanctions, we look at a new film "road map to apartheid." >> i have been able to visit israel and palestine on more than two occasions. and what i experienced there was such a cruel reminder of a at a painful to protest south africa. we were largely controlled in the same way. >> we will speak with the israeli and south african born co-director of the film, then reverend billy on the end of the world. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. people across the united states are expected to join a moment of silence
headlines around the globe. conflicteteriorating -- concerns that the u.s. -- that the government will use chemical weapons. >> i want to make it clear that the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. >> centuries after ernest shackleton to the death defying journey, a new team is out to repeat the trip, minus any modern conveniences. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. it is an announcement many have been waiting for. today's news that the duchess of cambridge is expecting a child was greeted with delight and concern. from around the world, congratulations have been pouring in for the royal couple, including well wishes from the white house. the 30-year-old duchess is suffering from severe morning sickness. she has been hospitalized for several days. our royal correspondent starts our coverage. >> departing from hospital this evening, the father to be. william had spent several hours with his wife. they had driven to london earlier together. it was earlier this week and that the sickness st
forces in there in the street using politics and the ballot box. the point i was trying to stress, may last point is the u.s. writ large, the government and also civil society organization and others are largely standing on the sideline here. bob's organization put out an excellent report last week people should look at my organization. usip data private study. right now u.s. policy, also civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here or there was a desire among local forces including younger islamists who want to bring about changes in their political movement in for the large purse sitting on the sidelines here we need to do more. >> we need to move on to the q&a portion here. a few questions from the audience. if you have a question, research and peer to microphone circulating. 10 minutes before we begin to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face
. stay with me. it is basically weird. on tuesday, the senate rejected a u.s. treaty aimed at protecting the rights of disabled people around the world. it is modeled on the americans for disability act. 125 other countries ratified it but in the full senate 38 republicans voted no leaving it 5 votes short of ratification. what we learned today is that some of the very same senators actually supported the treaty before they voted against it. some even pledged their support publicly. senator roy blunt of missouri was a flip flopper and kay bailey hutchison and jerry moran of kansas. they all declined to come on the program. they're silent. senator moran was a cosponsor of the measure to ratify the treaty and put a press release back in may proclaiming support for the treaty. i want to show you something else. here's senator moran with former senator bob dole in june. dole, a war veteran, a listening time supporter of disability rights and advocate of this treaty. just before tuesday's vote, he came to the senate chamber, 89, frail in the wheelchair and thought it was that important to be
not to meet with us. the message about our concern, again, not just those of the united states but britain and france come we traveled there as the t-3, three permanent members of the security council who have worked together on many issues. but we did speak with the foreign minister, plus some of her colleagues. again, we raised the issue of the need to and outside support. as in previous discussions, the rwandan government strongly, vehemently denies that it is providing any assistance to the m23, and it has not taken the steps of publicly denouncing on a bilateral basis the m23. so we have raised this, and it's important that we continue to monitor this as others in the international community do on a very, very close basis. with respect to your second question about international support, or at least our bilateral support to the rwandan government, i start with what i said to congressman marino earlier, is that they utilize their international assistance, not only from us in particular, but others very, very effectively and to use it with great integrity. people get it. we are not prov
were their sort of elements where we agree and hing,f t that will help us understand g in iraq or afghanistan or other conflicts, think if you want a of the viet nam war it is worth the to work like this that will help triet .. .. this is just under an hour. [applause] shalom, good evening, everybody. it's my pleasure to be with uiq. i'm very happy to see so many people coming here and showing an interest in my boat i would like in the next 20 minutes to show we do not want this in the book, but behind the idea. we can all agree with happening in israel is important to the people who live in the united states of america. why? because we share the same values, the same principles, the same heritage and the same enemies. because we are in the middle east today, dean attacked we ask ourselves why these people against the jewish nation in the middle east. not because of the lens we so-called occupied. it is the value we are working upon them in israel and the values of our democracy following very carefully their election he
alarmed people in neighboring countries. senior officials have met with their u.s. counterparts to coordinate their response. south korea's chief nuclear negotiator and the head of the japanese foreign ministries headed to washington. they met with u.s. special representative on north korea, glen davies. they will continue diplomatic efforts until the last minute. >> translator: we also agreed that the international community should take firm action if north korea goes ahead with the launch. >> sugiyama said he hopes to visit beijing to discuss the matter with chinese officials. >> they're ignored warnings over the year when they went ahead with a launch that ended in failure. covering the korean peninsula, we see why leaders in the north are pushing ahead despite opposition. >> reporter: the ballistic missile launch will be the second since kim jong-un took power a year ago. it will use the same launch pad, a site in the northwestern part of the country. before the first testing, officials said the three-stage rocket was meant to carry a satellite. but japan and the u.s. and so
the possible use of weapons of mass destruction if south. >> the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> the chattering classes are already chatting about 2016. >> look, i am flattered, i am honored. that is not in the future for may. "tim brant's college football captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> for the record, the unemployment rate has dropped to 7.7%, the economy adding 146,000 jobs in november. we want to keep that in mind as we head towards the fiscal cliff. only four in 10 americans expect the white house and congress to reach a deal on the cliff before the first of the year, and if this goes south, a 53% of the american people are prepared to blame republicans. the president's job approval rating is well over 50%. congress' approval rating is under 20%. why what a the president back down? >> the president isn't interested in a balanced agreement, not particularly interested in avoiding a fiscal cliff, and clearly not been tested at all in cutting and spending. >> the senate minority leader says that what the president is
children. simon joins us with the latest. what doing about the investigation so far. >> one man has been arrested and according to reports second has been made. police are not commenting, but they say they are still looking for witnesses including one man in particular. they're continuing to examine the context of the bag found at the train station. the unconfirmed reports suggested contained butane gas, ammonium nitrate, an alarm clock, and batteries. what they have not found is a detonator. it's not yet clear whether this was a live ball or just equipment. >> what do we know about the one man who has been arrested? >> he has been identified by his lawyer as omar d. he is a known as llamas the extremist and the as a member of a small group of about 15 people of somali origin who describe themselves as german shabab. les have known about him for some time. he was one of two men they pulled off a plane in cologne in 2008 because they feared they were heading to take part in a terrorist training camp in east africa. islamists have targeted train stations, at least one, before in germany. i
the claims are baseless. >> translator: they're using propaganda to scare people and harm our relations with north korea and other countries. >> the spokesperson acknowledged the two countries cooperated militarily in the 1980s during the iran/iraq war but he says that cooperation since then has been limited to economic areas. the second in command and mahmoud ahmadinejad agreed in september to cooperate in the field of science and technology. >>> china's new communist party leader has gone on his first tour since assuming the post last month. he's promising to carry on with the reforms of his predecessors. state-run china central television reported on xi's five-day trip. he laid flowers last saturday at the statue of the late leader. he said he'll push forward with reforms and with opening up china. xi appears to be following in dong's footsteps. the former leader visited the province 20 years ago and preached about accelerated reforms and more openness. >>> bankers are going through some troubled times these days. dirty money, bank rates manipulated, insider trading. ai joins us now
korea telex its first female president. she has pledged to help the ailing economy. >>> u.s. president barack obama says he wants concrete proposals on gun control presented to him by the end of next month. >> after the school shooting and connecticut, president obama said he was prepared to put the full weight of his office behind this issue. we now know how he plans to do that. these are the victims, three more children buried in newtown, conn., today, a teacher who tried to save them laid to rest as well. now politicians are talking about how to prevent another mass killing of children in their classrooms. >> we have a deep obligation, all of us, to try. >> not president obama has put vice president joe biden in charge, saying that he will outline his proposals next month. >> the good news is there is a growing consensus to build on, with a majority of support banning the sale of military- style assault weapons, a majority support the ammunition clips. that the president says that gun-control legislation will be part of it, but he is not saying, and nobody asked, if he is considerin
for us right now. "ac 360" starts right now. >> piers, thanks. good evening, everyone. we begin as we do every night, keeping them honest. looking for facts, not supporting democrats or republicans. our goal is just report, finding the facts, finding the truth. we did that last week. again, the more we look into it, the more we find people in powerful and influential places saying things that just don't square with the facts. it's about a u.n. treaty that failed to be ratified by the senate. a treaty that was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on equal rights of the disabled. if other countries adopted better treatment of their disabled citizens, the idea is that disabled americans who visit or live in other countries would also benefit. 125 countries ratified the treaty. it was supported by george bush, signed by the current president, and has support from both sides of the aisle like john mccain and bob dole himself a world war ii veteran. he was wheeled onto the senate floor, you can see, for the vote he hoped to see the treaty ratified. instead after pressure
-range rocket launch that's managed to put a satellite in earth's orbit. here's why it is important to all of us. even though north korea is one of the poorest countries and many people are starving there, the korean peninsula is the most tense, most dangerous places on earth. there are roughly one million north korean troops on it is side of the militarize zone separating from south korea. as well as nearly 30,000 u.s. forces. not only are they within strikes distance of the launch site, a long-range rocket shows north korea is on its way to developing technology to launch a rocket at the united states's west coast and hawaii. officials tell cnn that the working assumption is that the north koreans got outside help from others, including iran. so today's launch is raising some huge concerns. let's go to our pentagon correspondent barbara starr. i assume they are pretty surprised and alarmed by the successful launch over at the pentagon? >> look, wolf, because of everything you just mentioned, indeed, the u.s. military, the intelligence committee have been watching north korea for days now 24/7
. >> in the deadliest rampage at an elementary school in u.s. history, 20 kindergarten students and six staff members of the school are killed in newtown, connecticut. >> i have been at this for one- third of a century, and my sensibilities may not be of the average man, but this probably is the worst i have seen or the worst that i know of any of my colleagues have seen. >> the massacre occurred in newtown, connecticut, just miles from the national shooting sports foundation, the nation's second most powerful pro-gun lobby in the country after the national rifle association. we will host a debate on gun control between the gun honors for america and the coalition to stop gun violence. then we will speak to paul barrett, author of, "glock: the rise of america's gun." and we will get a report from the streets of cairo from sharif abdel kouddous. >> of voting among the division. egyptians headed to the polls on saturday in the sixth national election in nearly two years. this time, to vote on a referendum and a hotly disputed constitution. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," de
of libya's ire -- ire veal -- irrelevance of u.s. policy. go back to the libyan's fate, one, the u.s. relations with lip ya has been, you know, u.s. has always looked at libya as something of a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece, of a strategy that had to do with the region as a whole. it was never looked at -- it was never seen as an object in and of itself. could start with the relation of the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine, and the united states' desire to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid, to get itself together, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil, and the u.s. took a, well, you know, you're not really important as e just a minute, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it, and the result was that the prime minister of the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention, and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drastically th
in the assault on the u.s. consulate there. while susan rice was not responsible for security of the consulate, she did go on sunday shows and talk about the u.s. response there and she has been accused of deliberately mischaracterizing what happened. all sides -- or the white house has adamantly insisted and she has insisted that she in no way deliberately mischaracterized what happened. she was reading from unclassified talking points and nonetheless this has been caught up in a back and forth and, wolf, if i may, i'm going to read from part of her statement, her letter to the president and what she wrote in part, i am now convinced that the confirmation process will be lengthy, disruptive, and costly to you and to our most pressing national and international priorities. that tradeoff is simply not worth it to our country. the secretary of state may never be politicized. she says, i look forward to building on progress in your second term which seems to leave the door open to the possibility she could serve in the administration in the second term and according to my sources there has been s
all accounts, she's represented us very well and very effectively. >> now, ambassador, let's be real clear. what happened that day was that ambassador rice went on several sunday morning talk shows and told the nation what, in fact, she was told by intelligence sources that day. and repeated what she was told. >> and that's really the way most administrations work. you need to have a unity of people speaking in public. you don't want to have people speaking across from each other. and what happens before those sunday shows, al, as you know very well, is that people agree on talking points. what should the officials say on major issues. had any other senior administration official been out that day, five days after benghazi, they would have more than likely said what ambassador rice did. i never thought it was fair to say that she should have sole responsibility of that. she did not have line of authority for security for our consulate in benghazi. that wasn't her job as ambassador. i thought giving her the outs, as i just said, and giving her her very good service in the obama admini
you in, harris. thank you for joining us. "america live" starts right now. >> fox news extreme weather alert on the deadly storm that has caused major problems from texas to the northeast the storm is now blamed for a total of 15 deaths. whipping up tornados in the south, strong winds and rain along the atlantic coastline and dumping heavy snow from the plains to new england. the northeast getting hammered today. some areas are seeing more than a foot of snow while others deal with a heavy wind-swept rain leading to big airport delays in ohio, more than a thousand trucks are sent out, some getting heavy police escort as winds cause zero visibility. drivers say the situation is awful. >> i have seen 10 cars in an accident. i have saw a lexus fly into a ditch. i saw a semi-truck jackknife. all kinds of stuff. >> i have lost count of the number of cars i've seen in the ditch. i saw a jackknifed tractor-trailer. i saw a horse trailer that was turned over. so i think people are just not really driving slow enough for the conditions. >> pretty rough. we've seen a lot of accidents thus far in
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